lasatenforcer:

New pictures of the Zeb Orrelios maquette from Gentle Giant, as originally posted on their Facebook.

Simply marvelous!!

the-big-foot:

Science vs Magic

Aaron! You just keep getting more amazing! Transfer to my school already geez

the-big-foot:

Science vs Magic

Aaron! You just keep getting more amazing! Transfer to my school already geez

(Source: generic-art)

makaiwars:

So it’s my little sisters birthday

starwars:

No caption necessary.

starwars:

No caption necessary.

tatooinebreeze:

Today’s #McQuarrieMonday posts from the Star Wars social media sites.

Image Sources: Star Wars on Facebook, Star Wars on Google Plus, Star Wars on Tumblr, Star Wars on Twitter

seanhowe:

Above: Stan Lee’s open letter about Steve Ditko’s role in the creation of Spider-Man, 1999.




After Stan Lee reminisced in Comic Book Marketplace about his inspirations for writing an acclaimed late 1965 issue of Amazing Spider-Man, Steve Ditko broke his long silence. “Stan never knew what was in my plotted stories,” the artist wrote to the magazine’s editors, “until I took in the penciled story, the cover, my script and Sol Brodsky took the material from me and took it all into Stan’s office, so I had to leave without seeing or talking to Stan.” A few months later, after Lee was identified in Time as the creator of Spider-Man, Ditko popped up on that magazine’s letters page, too: “Spider-Man’s existence needed a visual concrete entity,” Ditko wrote. “It was a collaboration of writer-editor Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as co-creators.” This time Lee picked up the phone and called Ditko, for the first time in more than thirty years. 





“Steve said, ‘Having an idea is nothing, because until it becomes a physical thing, it’s just an idea,’ ” Lee recalled. “And he said it took him to draw the strip, and to give it life, so to speak, or to make it actually some- thing tangible. Otherwise, all I had was an idea. So I said to him, ‘Well, I think the person who has the idea is the person who creates it. And he said, ‘No, because I drew it.’ Anyway, Steve definitely felt that he was the co-creator of Spider-Man. And that was really, after he said it, I saw it meant a lot to him that was fine with me. So I said fine, I’ll tell everybody you’re the co-creator. That didn’t quite satisfy him. So I sent him a letter.” Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

seanhowe:

Above: Stan Lee’s open letter about Steve Ditko’s role in the creation of Spider-Man, 1999.

After Stan Lee reminisced in Comic Book Marketplace about his inspirations for writing an acclaimed late 1965 issue of Amazing Spider-Man, Steve Ditko broke his long silence. “Stan never knew what was in my plotted stories,” the artist wrote to the magazine’s editors, “until I took in the penciled story, the cover, my script and Sol Brodsky took the material from me and took it all into Stan’s office, so I had to leave without seeing or talking to Stan.” A few months later, after Lee was identified in Time as the creator of Spider-Man, Ditko popped up on that magazine’s letters page, too: “Spider-Man’s existence needed a visual concrete entity,” Ditko wrote. “It was a collaboration of writer-editor Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as co-creators.” This time Lee picked up the phone and called Ditko, for the first time in more than thirty years.

“Steve said, ‘Having an idea is nothing, because until it becomes a physical thing, it’s just an idea,’ ” Lee recalled. “And he said it took him to draw the strip, and to give it life, so to speak, or to make it actually some- thing tangible. Otherwise, all I had was an idea. So I said to him, ‘Well, I think the person who has the idea is the person who creates it. And he said, ‘No, because I drew it.’ Anyway, Steve definitely felt that he was the co-creator of Spider-Man. And that was really, after he said it, I saw it meant a lot to him that was fine with me. So I said fine, I’ll tell everybody you’re the co-creator. That didn’t quite satisfy him. So I sent him a letter.”

Text from Marvel Comics: The Untold Story.

kirkwa:

Creepy “Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark” Illustrations

These were the drawings of Stephen Gammell that kept us up at night as kids. They’re dark, brooding, creepy and down right macabre.

A few years ago they changed these too much more PG cartoony versions that just don’t pack the same nightmare inducing qualities.

(Source: everydayhaunt)

alwaysstarwars:

Beautifully atmospheric and evocative art by GrahamTG

Secret Law is Not Law

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

The Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Cindy Cohn is on fire: “Let’s be clear: Under international human rights law, secret “law” doesn’t even qualify as ‘law’ at all.”

The US Government and agencies like the DEA, NSA, TSA and FBI conduct mass-scale domestic…

art-of-swords:

Inside the World of Longsword Fighting

Longsword enthusiasts are resurrecting ancient sword technique as a modern, organized sport, with timed bouts and complex rules.

Source: Copyright © 2014 New York Times

studio-ghibli-gifs:

Ashitaka: They’re a sign the woods are healthy.